Author Topic: Engine  (Read 706 times)

Offline capecodprof

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Engine
« on: April 17, 2017, 10:02:14 AM »
Hi folks,
I am ne to this site.  I bought a Picnic Cat here on Cape Cod at the end of last season and only sailed her once.  I am now planning to get an engine and am back and forth between an electric and gas powered engine. Any advice here would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
John

Offline jdklaser

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Re: Engine
« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2017, 10:40:54 AM »
Just moved to a Lehr 5 hp propane outboard.  I waited a few years until all of the bugs were worked out and we'll see what happens, but I am confident it is the right choice.  No gas/oil mess and smell, Eco clean, 110 octane 4 stroke engine.  Also on the Cape.

Offline capecodprof

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Re: Engine
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2017, 11:27:09 AM »
Thanks, I'll look into that.

Offline Jon898

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Re: Engine
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2017, 08:40:24 AM »
It really depends on how you want to use the boat (and your sailing skills). If you only use a motor to get in and out of a slip, then I'd say go trolling motor (cheap and quiet).  If you plan on fighting a tidal current or have to negotiate a long narrow cut, then go for an engine (or if you've hit the lottery, a Torqeedo).  Three hp was plenty powerful enough for my PC and you'll want something as light as you can get to avoid having the stern squat.

As I've pointed out in other posts, other cultures will not even depend on an engine...it was quite common to see French flagged boats up to 30-feet on the English side of the Channel with only a sculling oar for auxilliary propulsion.

 I started with a 3-hp 2-stroke; when that began to be unreliable and need (unobtainable) parts, I switched to an electric trolling motor and deep cycle battery.  I couldn't be happier and the lack of motor-clatter is wonderful.  My usage is confined to getting away from the slipway before hoisting sails if I'm on the windward side of the launch ramp pontoon...otherwise it's not used as I have a sailboat.

Jon

Offline bruce

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Re: Engine
« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2017, 12:07:13 PM »
I currently use a Lehr 2.5 on my PC, and also have a Honda 2. Both have provided good service, each has their strengths and weaknesses.

As much as I'd like a real reverse as the Lehr 5 has, weight is a significant issue. The PC sails best on its lines, 50 lb. on the transom is a lot. Power wise, 2 HP is plenty, IMHO.
Bruce
Aroo, PC 308
Narragansett Bay, RI

Offline capecodprof

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Re: Engine
« Reply #5 on: April 19, 2017, 02:33:31 PM »
Thank you all for your advice.  I want the lightest,yet most power as I can a Cape Cod bay can chop up fast and Furious. Again,thank you.

Offline bruce

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Re: Engine
« Reply #6 on: April 19, 2017, 04:39:36 PM »
I have a friend who sails his PC out of Sesuit (Cape Cod Bay for those following along). He had a Tohatsu 3.5 that came with his boat that he replaced with a Honda 2 about 6 years ago when the Tohatsu died. He loves the Honda, and never has felt the need for more power.

The Lehr 2.5 only comes in a short shaft. It's not a deal breaker, but for me the long shaft is better in bouncy conditions. The short shaft can cavitate, even with the adjustable mount full down. But my CC friend, and I think a minority of other PC owners, prefer the short shaft.

Both my Honda 2 (current version is 2.3) and Lehr 2.5 drive the boat at hull speed at about 60-70% throttle.

Following seas can be exciting, in stronger conditions you'll want to move weight to the center so the stern and bow can lift readily.
Bruce
Aroo, PC 308
Narragansett Bay, RI

Offline capecodprof

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Re: Engine
« Reply #7 on: April 19, 2017, 10:29:01 PM »
I'll be going out of Sesuit as well.  I love that spot.  Thanks for the advice....interesting idea on the long vs short shafts. Thanks!

Offline bruce

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Re: Engine
« Reply #8 on: April 20, 2017, 07:22:13 AM »
When I look back at your original post, I see you were thinking about electric as well. Lots of PC sailors use trolling motors, and mount the battery forward for trim, and I have helped a fellow PC sailor set up a Torqeedo 1003 for use here on Narraganset Bay. But, for the exposure of Cape Cod Bay, the currents associated with a tidal range of 10', and the potential need for some serious range if a wind shift catches you off guard, I think you'll be happier with fuel.

Until he got a slip in Sesuit, my friend would trailer up to Truro on days with a north wind. I'm jealous of the beaches at both sites!
Bruce
Aroo, PC 308
Narragansett Bay, RI

Offline capecodprof

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Re: Engine
« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2017, 05:25:44 PM »
Thanks everyone...I decided, with the help of my brother,  on a Suzuki 2.5.  He had had one for awhile and days it is reliable and fairly quiet.  He is the Engineering Prof in the family and I an the English Prof.....I had to go with him.  Thanks so much for your help.!

Offline fasteddie

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Re: Engine
« Reply #10 on: May 13, 2017, 01:27:53 PM »
I have a 3 hp torqueedo, it is fantastic, moves my picnic cat at 2 knots for 45 minutes or more, used it on the Chesapeake with a good chop , and had no problem, good feeling its going to work everytime I'm out, it is pricey , but its my last boat and I splurged, got a pc with a navy blue hull and all the options except teak grates and cushions, sold my cp 19, happy sailing !
CP 19  "La Bella Vita"  hull #45

Offline bruce

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Re: Engine
« Reply #11 on: May 18, 2017, 07:35:33 AM »
Is that the 1003, fasteddie? I have a friend who uses a 1003L on her PC her on Narragansett Bay. She likes it as well: Quick start, reverse, easy to handle, no fuel hassles. She use the optional remote throttle control and locks the pivot. The balance in the head is such that when tilted the motor can pivot rather abruptly, landing hard on the deck flange. She also learned, the hard way, to engage the manual lock before reversing the motor to prevent the motor from climbing out of the water. She broke a blade off the prop, but otherwise escaped damage or injury.
Bruce
Aroo, PC 308
Narragansett Bay, RI

Offline Finbar Beagle

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Re: Engine
« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2017, 08:50:46 PM »
I have been using the Torqeedo1003l on a cp 19-2.  It has done all I asked for, but I needed to add additional battery pack to extend range in case of mishap (security).  The extra battery was ove $500 usd, but for me it was well worth it.
Brian, Finbar Beagle's Dad

Siren 17, Boston Whaler Harpoon 5.2, Bauer 12
CP 19 MkII- Galway Terrapin, Hull 372
Kettle Creek, Barnegat Bay, NJ