Author Topic: outboard  (Read 594 times)

Offline Allthatjazz

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outboard
« on: September 22, 2017, 09:14:20 PM »
Can anyone tell me the biggest motor I can put on my 16 and the best bracket to use? I would like to have electric start if possible

Offline nies

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Re: outboard
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2017, 05:01:45 AM »
Motor choice is like dating.............all in the eye of the beholder.............for me the 5.0 MERC is the best, lot of HP when needed and weight is proportional to HP..................any bracket rated for HP,but needes to be raised when not in use.............nies

Offline BrickBridge

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Re: outboard
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2017, 03:05:20 PM »
I have a 2016 Tohatsu 4 hp 20" shaft on a generic four bolt adjustable motor mount.  The mount gets the motor totally out of the water for sailing (pictures included) but at 60 lbs, it is not easy to lift up. The smallest motors with electric start are in the 8 hp range and weigh 90-95 lbs. I can't imagine lifting a beast like that out of the water when not needed. My Tohatsu at 60 lbs significantly effects longitudinal (for and aft) trim. I have to keep everyone in the front of the cockpit to avoid water coming in through the self bailing scuppers. A big heavy electric start motor would be even worse. My 4 hp is already overkill for power. I rarely run it above a fast idle. that being said, I believe most manufacturers 4, 5 , and 6 hp models are the same weight as they use the same motor with different tuning. You could get a little more power without adding weight but the extra power comes at the top of the rev range which you will never really use. All a bigger motor does is turn dead dinosaurs into noise a little faster without a lot of gain in speed. I went with the 4 hp instead of something smaller so I would have the option to charge from the motor as well as use an external or internal fuel tank.

If your willing to spend the big bucks on an electric start motor, have you considered a Torqueedo electric motor? They are not any more expensive than an electric start 8 hp from most manufacturers and they don't require starting or gas and they are lightweight to boot.  I would have one if it wasn't for the price compared to smaller gas engines.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2017, 03:16:46 PM by BrickBridge »

Offline Allthatjazz

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Re: outboard
« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2017, 09:54:14 PM »
Thanks guys. I'll get it figured out, but I'm getting the message small motor is good enough.

Offline Yamaha33410

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Re: outboard
« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2017, 09:07:05 AM »
My 4hp 4 stroke Yamaha seems like it is too much motor for my 16, it's 60lbd and effects the balance, also never gone over 1/3 throttle lol....sorry for any typos used my phone
1981 Compac 16

1979 Compac 23

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Offline MHardy

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Re: outboard
« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2017, 05:44:10 PM »
I have a Honda 2hp on my 16. The power is fine for getting in and out of the marina. Its weight doesn't cause issues. Of course, no electric start or reverse gear (you spin the motor around for reverse). I HATE having to spin it around!

Offline Finbar Beagle

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Re: outboard
« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2017, 08:10:12 PM »
I am big believer in Torqeedo.  I use the 1003 on my 19, so would be better on the 16.

Con-
Cost
Need multiple batteries for long distance/ against tide.  I recommend having a backup.  This means more cost, but not more space than an external gas tank.

Pros
Easy start
Maintenance free (I am very challenged by cumbustable engines...enough said) no winterizing.
Light weight-carry battery separately and Torqeedo has good carry bags)

Did I mention the cost...for me the right choice, but you could get 2 new motors for same cost.

I do get the good, green feeling, about helping the environment, especially when I find myself in an exhaust cloud if a cigarette boat (I live in NJ, and sail on very popular bay).

It can also be used on lakes / Water sheds  that do not allow gas motors.
Brian, Finbar Beagle's Dad

Siren 17, Boston Whaler Harpoon 5.2, Bauer 12
CP 19 MkII- Galway Terrapin, Hull 372
Kettle Creek, Barnegat Bay, NJ

Offline JTMeissner

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Re: outboard
« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2017, 07:44:56 AM »
And at the other end of the spectrum, there are some of us that find trolling motors to suffice for our needs.  I guess the next step down is oarlocks/oars and/or a yuloh, which have been done. 

I'm now on the west side of the Chesapeake Bay (north end) and find winds fairly consistent with little tide.  Switched from a 40-lb thrust motor to a saltwater rated 55-lb thrust, and it works for me.  When on a lake, the 40 pounder was quite sufficient.  Almost silent, nice for evening/sunset cruises.  Not anywhere in the same class as the Torqueedo, either power or price.  Big battery up front helps with trim concerns, motor is pretty light.

Now, on the rivers of NE Georgia with large tide shifts and good current, I used the 4hp that came with the boat (also saltwater rated).  Zero headway was always a possibility.  It weighed down the stern, so I have plugs for the scupper holes to keep feet dry.

Your question was about biggest and the bracket.  As others have mentioned, weight is probably a bigger concern than power, any of the smaller motors will be enough.  I had been looking at the Lehr propane motors, with the tough decision about their 2.3 vs 5 hp motors, with weight, F/R switch, etc. all in the consideration.  Went back to trolling motor in the end (light and quiet).

On the bracket issue, I hadn't put much thought beyond what came on the boat.  I did put a bit more support under the bracket when I had the opportunity to change out the bolts/screws that mounted it, but the fiberglass in the transom is probably sufficient.  I think any motor mount rated enough for the size (weight and hp) will be fine, can't recommend a kayak/canoe bracket, tilt and lift options as desired.

As nies said, it's all up to your preference and needs.  Just don't let it stop you from getting out there and sailing.

-Justin

Offline Finbar Beagle

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Re: outboard
« Reply #8 on: September 25, 2017, 10:11:59 AM »
I looked closely at Lehr, but was concerned on ability to easily replace tank when underway.  I was thinking small propane bottle, and I may have stripped the demo at West marine when I tried, whoops, my bad.
Brian, Finbar Beagle's Dad

Siren 17, Boston Whaler Harpoon 5.2, Bauer 12
CP 19 MkII- Galway Terrapin, Hull 372
Kettle Creek, Barnegat Bay, NJ

Offline DaleM

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Re: outboard
« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2017, 11:15:51 AM »
You have excellent options posted above;  I use a 30 lb. minn kota in lakes here in Cent. Ga.
I use a 4 hp. outboard in the Gulf of Mexico close to shore.  I almost always tilt the outboard out of the water under sail.  It makes a significant difference.
Good luck on your options.
If not now..When?

Offline Mas

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Re: outboard
« Reply #10 on: September 25, 2017, 09:33:15 PM »
4 hp Suzuki 2 stroke. Reasonable weight, good power, came with boat, which is probably going to be the choice that you make, as many of the 16's for sale come with a motor, or at least as an option. It really will depend on where you plan to sail. 4 horses will get me home in short order and have plenty of power for contrary tides, current and wind.

Didn't use a motor at all for the first almost two years and had a long paddle. My very understanding wife insisted on the motor and after we got one couldn't believe i had waited so long, other than a misguided belief you don't need one if a true sailor!
S/V  'Mas'  87' CP16/2
S/V  'Interlude' 89' PSC31

Offline carry-on

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Re: outboard
« Reply #11 on: September 26, 2017, 12:57:08 PM »
My 4hp , four stroke Nissan works well but weighs 59 pounds. Easy to lift out of the drink when sailing, but less weight aft would be good. Would like something lighter without giving up reverse and remote tank.
What is the reason for not having reverse on a 2.5 or 3 hp outboard?
How about developing a 3 or 4 hp , two stroke, that pleases EPA?
$UM FUN TOO

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Offline Short Sale

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Re: outboard
« Reply #12 on: October 01, 2017, 01:41:39 PM »
Short Sale is outfitted with a 3.5hp Tohatsu regular shaft.  It weighs about 43 lbs.  The short shaft is plenty long with the motor mount lowered while under power and stays completely out of the water in the raised position while under sail. The internal tank holds about 1 gallon of gasoline and it takes me almost all season to burn it out.  I do keep spare fuel in the lazarette.  She runs in and out of the marina at idle speed, but has plenty of power and speed to work against a tide or out run a fast approaching storm.

My advice would be to not over power your boat.  You do not want the weight.
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Offline moonlight

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Re: outboard
« Reply #13 on: October 30, 2017, 11:38:25 PM »
Probably too late to be of any benefit ... but Torqeedo, or trolling motor, both are excellent ideas.

Now, this next bit is a bit for the hobbyist; it's not yet mainstream.  But I've done it, and it's efficient.  (Side note - NOT ADVERTISEMENT - Moonlight Marine Inc is also involved in many facets of electric propulsion.  But you guys get free stuff, worth what you pay for it).

In the past year or so, we've removed 660# of AGM batteries (four group 31 x 105Ah = 420 Ah PLUS four group 34 x 55Ah = 220Ah total 640Ah) from, of all things, a 28' Boston Whaler.  These were 10-year old dealership rigged units running an inverter to run air-conditioning underway since the Verado outboards couldn't do it.  In half the space we set 480Ah of Lithium Iron Phosphate batteries weighing 115# which actually gives longer run time for the air conditioner (because AGM allows 50% depth of discharge or 320 useable amp hours whereas LiFePO4 allows 80% DOD or 360Ah).

We've also just installed a 5KW, 2x12v 200Ah (400Ah total) system on a 36' trawler, in lieu of the 4x8D (4x180#) AGM batteries they started with.   Our 5KW, 400Ah battery pack fits in a 14x14x14 space and weighs 176#.

I can configure you a LiFePO4 trolling motor battery, the size of a group 27, 24 or 36V, 150Ah+.  Does it cost more than a good AGM deep cycle?  Sure.  But it also sports a design life 6x as long...

Lithium batteries, not for the unitiated, but properly managed are a complete and total game changer for electric propulsion.  Torqueedo uses them.  So can you.  And at a fraction of the cost.  AND OF A CHEMISTRY that keeps you out of the newspaper (not subject to thermal runaway or meltdown).