Author Topic: Light wind sailing  (Read 4465 times)

Offline capt_nemo

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Re: Light wind sailing
« Reply #15 on: June 29, 2015, 10:46:25 PM »
In light air NYLON is KING!

And, setting the headsail "flying" is the way to go!

capt_nemo

Offline legends117

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Re: Light wind sailing
« Reply #16 on: June 30, 2015, 07:18:48 AM »
Thanks for all the insight.  I have one more question - since the existing halyards are internal to the mast, I assume that adding another halyard, would mean running the line on the outside of the mast to a block that would be attached to the mast, right?  I try to do my own work, so I just want to be clear about how the lines are supposed to be run.  Thanks - JD
- JD Johnson
Panama City Beach, FL
Com-Pac 25, Hull #9
S/V Dutch Roll (from the previous 2 owners, & before that she was "somewhere up North" called Stella Bella)

Offline HeaveToo

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Re: Light wind sailing
« Reply #17 on: June 30, 2015, 09:36:23 AM »
My Spinnaker halyard would run outside the mast.  They run from the tang on the top of the mast down to a turning block at the bottom of mast (Usually attached to the deck).  You can cleat it to a cleat on the mast as it will be easy to raise. 
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Offline Salty19

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Re: Light wind sailing
« Reply #18 on: June 30, 2015, 08:14:53 PM »
For the sail head connection on the flying drifter, I installed a Racelite Mast Hound available at Duckworks.  The small size, I think, but do measure to be sure.

http://www.duckworksbbs.com/hardware/rigging/rl325/index.htm

I don't have close up pics, but I believe I mounted the hound just barely above the upper shroud bolts through the mast, then put a smallish swivel block on the end of the hound, with dedicated halyard.  Now since the CP19 is a masthead rig it allowed for this mounting location.  The location would be considerably lower on the Eclipse, I think...

You do have to be careful to ensure there is no interference with the furler halyard, swivel and rolled up sail in that area.  Mine fits well but I seem to recall hemming and hawing over this quite a bit before drilling the hole and ordering the sail (custom since the luff is unique).   I actually run the main and drifter halyards through the port side aft led blocks and the jib halyard I cleat to the mast. That way you don't have halyards crossing the furler and have control over the drifter from the cockpit.

You could also consider just getting a nice size genoa instead with lightweight cloth, or even nylon.It might point a little better?   I went with the drifter because I didn't want to take down the jib/genoa on the furler.  Too much hassle and if the wind picks back up again it's a whole lot easier to douse the flying sail than removing it from the furler and re-installing a jib.

And yes, I can go dual headsail wing on wing if I want to.  I did try it once just for fun but generally just let the main fill the headsails instead and tie on a preventer to the boom to keep the main from creating an accidental gybe.

Capt Nemo is right...nylon is the right way to go when considering a light air sail.

Also, don't underestimate your technique as you can squeak out more speed without these sails.  Maybe not much, but sometimes that's enough.
Loosen halyards, let the foots breathe, don't pinch too tight, watch rudder (brake) angle.  Loose footed fully battened mains are real nice in light air too.

« Last Edit: July 01, 2015, 03:20:16 PM by Salty19 »
"Island Time" 1998 Com-pac 19XL # 603

Offline cal27sailor

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Re: Light wind sailing
« Reply #19 on: June 30, 2015, 10:26:43 PM »
What are your opinions on using a symmetrical spinnaker with an ATN Tacker, rather than a spinnaker pole?  I have a Tacker but have never used it on my other boat as I generally single hand and she is too big to try the spinnaker solo.  I would like to try it on the CP19.  I have also found a very good deal on a new symmetrical spinnaker for a Rhodes 19 which closely compares to the standard size spinnaker for a CP19.  Wondering if this might be a low cost opportunity to pursue.  Thoughts?
Tony
"Rita Marlene", 1984 CP-19, Hull #231
Grand Lake Sailing Club, Grove, OK

Offline skip1930

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Re: Light wind sailing
« Reply #20 on: June 30, 2015, 10:55:48 PM »
An asymmetric Star-Cut spinnaker with an ATN spinnaker sleeve is what is used on my CP-19 and it is easy to single handle BUT the tiller must be dogged into position for a short time.

I roll up the 155% head sail on the Harkin Furler and go forward to clip the spinnaker's tack onto the bow pulpit. The halyard snaps onto the ATN ring. And the clew is fed all the way back to the stern cleat, outside of everything.

Have to do with quickly to return to the dogged down tiller. The ATN which I have has the lines run back to the cockpit through deck pulleys and deck organizer to the rope clutch. The sock is then pulled up to the masthead and the spinnaker fills. Make the adjustments and fly the spinnaker for a few hours. My spinnaker is sewn out of 3/4 ounce [?] I think material. To change tacs, a trip forward is necessary and collapse the spinnaker by pulling the ATN sock down first. It's a pain.

You made mention of making the Legacy faster ... with a CP-19 the terminal hull speed is around 5.4[?] knots. Not particularly fast no matter what you I do and how much canvas is set. I'll take comfort over speed any day.  

Want head snapping speed, sail a Star boat in Lake Michigan.



skip.


  
« Last Edit: June 30, 2015, 11:12:01 PM by skip1930 »

Offline skip1930

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Re: Light wind sailing
« Reply #21 on: June 30, 2015, 11:16:16 PM »
The asymmetrical spinnaker won't need a pole.
The symmetrical spinnaker you'll need a pole.

I think that's right.

As a high school kid I was the 'spinnaker-man' on a three man crew racing a Rhodes 19 [keel] in Lake Michigan.
I'm done with racing ... too much work.

skip.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2015, 11:19:08 PM by skip1930 »

Offline HeaveToo

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Re: Light wind sailing
« Reply #22 on: July 01, 2015, 08:37:16 AM »
Get an autopilot.  They are cheap (compared to a below deck or wheel pilot).  You can find them for under $500 and it will be the best thing you ever bought if you single hand.  I have single handed different boats on the Chesapeake Bay for the past 10 years and found that to be the best piece of gear ever.  I operate a lot of the time with an autopilot on so I am not tied to the helm.

On a smaller boat I would say that you can save your money and not get a sleeve.

You can get a cheap symmetrical spinnaker.  A J24 is close to a Compac 23 (J24 is fractional and that is why it works) and I saw all kinds of deals on used J24 spinnakers.  The problem is that the pole is VERY expensive and even a used one is expensive.
Døyr fe, døyr frender
Døyr sjølv det sama
men ordet om deg aldreg døyr
vinn du et gjetord gjevt