Author Topic: Torqeedo and CP 19 MkII  (Read 1978 times)

Offline Finbar Beagle

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Torqeedo and CP 19 MkII
« on: July 04, 2016, 07:09:34 PM »
I purchased my CP 19 MkII at end of last year.  For previous 2 years I sailed a Boston whaler 5.2 harpoon with Torqeedo 1003 electric outboard.

Motor did all I asked and went on CP 19.  I added a spare battery thinking I would need to run the 3 horse equivalent at higher rev to move the heavier CP.

All worked well until today, July 4th.  Torqeedo powered well in reverse out if slip, but prop did not catch in forward, or reverse later.  It spun at low revs while motor was spinning on high.  I hit hard bottom with prop earlier in weekend and suspect I stripped the prop.  I had already ordered a spare and will change when it is received.  I tried to tighten the 5/11 prop nut, it helped in reverse, but prop slipped again in forward.  I was happy to have just enough prop spin to avoid a tow by local jet ski gang, and gain slip without help.

No booze was harmed or spilt in returning to dock.

Has anyone had same issue?

Regards,
Brian- Barnegat bay
Brian, Finbar Beagle's Dad

Siren 17, Boston Whaler Harpoon 5.2, Bauer 12
CP 19 MkII- Galway Terrapin
Kettle Creek, Barnegat Bay, NJ

Offline Wes

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Re: Torqeedo and CP 19 MkII
« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2016, 07:44:02 AM »
Hope you will continue to post about the 19/Torqeedo combo after you fix the prop. My Mercury 4 cycle 5 hp has expired and I'm seriously interested in going electric. Love everything I've seen about the Torqeedo but not certain it will get me safely home on a blowy, choppy day. Keep us posted!

Wes
"Bella", 1988 CP 19/3 #453
Washington, North Carolina

Offline jim1440

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Re: Torqeedo and CP 19 MkII
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2016, 08:23:21 AM »
I have the same questions as Wes regarding the ability of the Torqeedo to handle a C19 .. Would very much like to go electric and not have to battle the engine to sail! So any insights into the range of experiences would be appreciated.

Jim
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Belle Eire
CP19/3 #494

Offline cdflan

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Re: Torqeedo and CP 19 MkII
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2016, 01:11:29 PM »
You could also consider a Torqeedo Cruise 2.0 or 4.0 (5 to 6 HP and 8 to 10 HP equivalent) which would certainly be adequate even though they are less convenient (and more expensive) because of the remote battery(s).  In my case, placing the batteries forward in the bilge actually helped with trim.

Offline Tom L.

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Re: Torqeedo and CP 19 MkII
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2016, 02:20:53 PM »
Wow I just checked the web site. The cruise 4 is 5G and the two remote batteries 5G plus other items like a controller and cut off switch. Over 10 G? Is that right? On top of that you will have limited range. Then you have to make sure they are charged when you want to go out for a long weekend or week cruise. What would you do if you were cruising and the batteries were too low?
I can't justify that cost and to me it seems inconvenient. A reasonably maintained 8hp O.B. so much less in initial cost and reliable for years.

Tom L.
Present boat, Menger 19 "Wild Cat"    O'Day 25, Montego 25, Catalina 30, Tartan 37, Catalina 380, Mariner 19, Potter 19, Sun Cat

Offline Bilge Rat

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Re: Torqeedo and CP 19 MkII
« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2016, 05:36:42 PM »
A Torqeedo 1003L came with my Sun Cat purchased by the previous owner. I prefer my Tohatsu 3.5 hp primarily because of the limited range of the Torqeedo.

 
'09 Sun Cat, '06 Catalina 16.5, '00 Lido 14, '84 Holder 14

Offline Potcake boy

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Re: Torqeedo and CP 19 MkII
« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2016, 09:06:23 PM »
Over the years I have looked at electrical propulsion, and it has been improving a lot recently. Schock Harbor 20 comes with electrical power. The Torqueedo model range has been expanded and is viable but as was pointed out, they are damn expensive. If only the battery technology could match the needs of extended cruising then aside from the cost we'd have a winning solution.  I was looking at a Cruise 4.0 model for example and discovered that the model designation is determined by the power requirement, the 4.0 is 40 amps at 48VDC. It could work if I could just bring myself to mount a huge generator on the boat.

I did find great success on a Picnic Cat with a trolling motor and a battery mounted forward. It provided good trim for the boat and was adequate for day sailing. Trolling motors are a fraction of the cost of Torqueedos and work fine on small displacement sailboats. As far as I know, trolling motors are designed to provide a maximum speed of about 5mph (hint: the word trolling) and are therefore suitable for our purpose, and you just need thrust rating to match your displacement.

In the mean time, I think the common consensus is that it's hard to justify electric over gas outboards.

If any one has a success story about using  electrical propulsion, please share it.
Ron
Pilot House 23 - GladRags
Punta Gorda Florida

A mouse around the house - but much hotter on the water

Offline Finbar Beagle

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Re: Torqeedo and CP 19 MkII
« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2016, 10:16:41 AM »
Based on my past 2 years with the Torqeedo 1003L, my confidence level is high.  But I had to take in several considerations.

First, I had to get spare battery to push heavier boat at high revs.
Second, I am in protected bay, with gentle shore and sand/mud bottom.  Worse case is have to shelter out a rough blow if I am too far to power in.  I am the type that refuses to motor, except to get in slip.  That was my neighbors decision, not mine.

I just received replacement prop, and will try to update post with various weather/wave/mileage updates.  Now, I use it for 300 yard run down lagoon to slip.

Regards,
Brian
Brian, Finbar Beagle's Dad

Siren 17, Boston Whaler Harpoon 5.2, Bauer 12
CP 19 MkII- Galway Terrapin
Kettle Creek, Barnegat Bay, NJ

Offline Ralph Erickson

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Re: Torqeedo and CP 19 MkII
« Reply #8 on: July 29, 2016, 09:12:30 AM »
I've had a Torqeedo 1003L for 2 years now, which I use with my 1986 CP 19 MKII on a lake in Pennsylvania. I absolutely love it, and it's perfect for my purposes, which are getting in and out of my slip onto the lake, and sometimes motoring around the lake when there is no wind. I would be hesitant to use it in conditions such as strong currents or long distances unless I had a spare battery, as the power drains fairly quickly when it's under a lot of stress. On our lake, however, I can motor literally for hours without worry. I had an issue with the power cable shorting out last year, (a very rare occurance, they tell me) and after I contacted the company, they had me ship it to their repair center in Conneticut, and I had it back within a week, all expenses paid by Torqueedo. Great customer service. After dealing with tempermental gas engines for years, the Torqueedo can't be beat. Starts every time!!!!!! Lots of people on our lake are getting them.
CP19II #347
"Patricia Lee"
www.sailaway.smugmug.com/boats

Offline cdflan

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Re: Torqeedo and CP 19 MkII
« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2016, 08:25:27 AM »
Electric currently is definitely more expensive but is the most elegant auxiliary power I've ever had in more than 60 years of sailing.  Have a Torqeedo Cruise 4.0 in my Horizon Cat going on two years now and more than satisfied.  Cabin still has that new wood smell and when you need power, just drop your hand to the throttle lever and off you go!  With the 205 AH batteries I installed, range is not a problem - 35 NM at 4.5 KT and can reach hull speed at 6 KT to get through an inlet but sacrificing range to under 10 NM.
Now for the down side.  It was expensive at $4000 for the motor/control package and $2000 for the batteries plus cabling, charger, etc.  Battery weight adds 500 pounds but as mentioned above, putting one or two forward makes the trim easier (one of mine was dropped into the keel forward of the centerboard trunk and the other three in the space where the diesel would have mounted).  You do need to cruise between marinas so that you can plug in overnight (although if you were just using power for occasional maneuvering, solar recharge would probably work and with smaller batteries).
Overall, very, very happy with electric power.  If you want the details on my installation (which was much more elaborate than hanging the Cruise 4.0 on the transom) - http://cpyoa.geekworkshosting.com/forum/index.php?topic=6926.msg50151#msg50151

Offline Bilge Rat

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Re: Torqeedo and CP 19 MkII
« Reply #10 on: August 02, 2016, 02:24:33 PM »
I think I read somewhere that when you are sailing you need to raise the prop out of the water or the natural spin of the prop can damage the electric motor. Is this true? My frustration is that when I raise my outboard bracket to the highest setting and engage the tilt on the torqeedo, the throttle handle does not pivot high enough to comfortably clear the top of the transom. I end up having to take the handle off and unplug it during sail which is annoying. This is on a sun cat.

« Last Edit: August 02, 2016, 02:28:12 PM by Bilge Rat »
'09 Sun Cat, '06 Catalina 16.5, '00 Lido 14, '84 Holder 14

Offline Ralph Erickson

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Re: Torqeedo and CP 19 MkII
« Reply #11 on: August 02, 2016, 04:39:29 PM »
Bilge Rat,

You can purchase a longer cord for the throttle handle and re-position the throttle handle to a better place. My friend, Gil Weiss, who has a CP 19 and had similiar issues, did this and fashioned a neat place in the cockpit to place the throttle handle, keeping it out of the way.  I'll contact him and perhaps he can explain better what he did, and perhaps post some pictures.
CP19II #347
"Patricia Lee"
www.sailaway.smugmug.com/boats

Offline Finbar Beagle

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Re: Torqeedo and CP 19 MkII
« Reply #12 on: August 02, 2016, 08:21:30 PM »
Bilge rat, I have that issue on my cp 19, but I rotate the Torqeedo 180 degrees and she rides nice with the handle up.
Brian, Finbar Beagle's Dad

Siren 17, Boston Whaler Harpoon 5.2, Bauer 12
CP 19 MkII- Galway Terrapin
Kettle Creek, Barnegat Bay, NJ

Offline Bilge Rat

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Re: Torqeedo and CP 19 MkII
« Reply #13 on: August 03, 2016, 02:08:09 PM »
I had thought of trying to rotate the handle 90 degrees to get it out of the way but if it goes 180 degrees then all the better. Thanks for this tip.
'09 Sun Cat, '06 Catalina 16.5, '00 Lido 14, '84 Holder 14

Offline Gil Weiss

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Re: Torqeedo and CP 19 MkII
« Reply #14 on: August 03, 2016, 06:10:48 PM »
I have been happily sailing a 1983 Compac 19, no 184, for the past eight years at Lake Nockamixon in SE Pennsylvania. 
(refer to my sailing friend Ralph Ericson's post above. Also check out Bilge Rats post) This is my 5th year using the Torqeedo LS 1003 electric motor.

I bought a 5 foot tiller extension cable from Torqeedo and designed and fabricated a few parts to make the motor fit my CP19 situation. NO mods are needed to the actual motor - a design consideration. I made a bracket to bolt to the rear seat, aka gas tank cover to which the tiller is held on with velcro. I then made a "stub tiller" to steer the motor when needed without interfering with the transom or railing. Finally, I fabricated a 3 inch high wood extension for my motor mount. This keeps the motor out of the water when in the vertical position while at my dock. (I take the battery home and put the tiller in the cabin)

All wood parts were made from pieces of red oak purchased at Lowes. They were finished with several coats of Cetol.

I drive from the port rear seat so the tiller is perfectly located to see the display and use the throttle. This set up works great. It also allows me to tilt up the motor when sailing. I keep the stub tiller and other motor parts tethered to the boat so nothing can be lost. I also removed half the springs from my raising/lowering motor mount since the Torqeedo weighs so little.
1983 CP 19 "Suo Gan"
(Hull #184)