Author Topic: Tunning the standing rig  (Read 531 times)

Offline brackish

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Tunning the standing rig
« on: October 15, 2017, 07:52:01 AM »
Almost fifty years of sailing, owned four boats over that time, sailed many more, and for the first time I tuned my rig the way it is supposed to be done.  This because I saw a good deal on a Loos PT1 on eBay.  The Loos folks say that almost everybody under tensions their rig because they are afraid of breaking something.  I decided to see if that holds true for me.  I raised my mast, set the furler and back stay, centered it port to starboard, then tensioned as I would normally do by feel.  I then put the Loos to them.  Each stay was approximately one half of the starting or minimum tension.  Reset using the gage, took about 30 minutes.

Probably will sail tomorrow and eager to see if it has any effect on the boat performance.

Offline Bob23

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Re: Tunning the standing rig
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2017, 07:16:16 PM »
Interesting, Brack. Where did you get the specs regarding the tensions for the 23? I am guilty of under tentioning my rig; tricky also to rake the mast forward 2 degrees....looks weird but that's what I understand the proper position to be.

Offline AislinGirlII

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Re: Tunning the standing rig
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2017, 07:59:03 PM »
I am interested too. Getting ready to step the mast after that "weather event" ran me out of the harbor and to the house last weekend..

Offline brackish

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Re: Tunning the standing rig
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2017, 09:51:52 PM »
The specs are based on the size of the wire rope.  For instance, for a 5/32" size which is the stay size for the 23, the minimum tension on the side shrouds should be 350 lbs. and the back stay should be a minimum of 500 lbs.  In my case with a furler, the forestay cannot be measured only the back stay..  When I did it by feel I was about half of those minimums.  Professional riggers who set up boats to race generally set tension greater than the minimum.

AislinGirlII I would loan you my Loos if I were coming down anytime soon, but probably be a month or better.  I'll PM you before I come if it happens to be convenient for you to check your rig.  Maybe LBYC has one you can use.
« Last Edit: October 15, 2017, 09:55:38 PM by brackish »

Offline Bob23

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Re: Tunning the standing rig
« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2017, 06:20:37 AM »
Brack: A silly question here but I'm assuming the tuning is while the boat's in the water? I ask because a few years ago, while my trusty 23 was on her trailer, I raised the mast and set the rigging only to find that after she was in, the tensions had changed noticeably. So that's how was I introduced to hull flex! Never thought about it before!

Offline brackish

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Re: Tunning the standing rig
« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2017, 06:55:28 AM »
Brack: A silly question here but I'm assuming the tuning is while the boat's in the water? I ask because a few years ago, while my trusty 23 was on her trailer, I raised the mast and set the rigging only to find that after she was in, the tensions had changed noticeably. So that's how was I introduced to hull flex! Never thought about it before!

Bob, I didn't think about it but I did do it in the water.  I've found it is easier to put my mast up after launching while in the water.  I generally launch and motor over to my slip before raising.  My system lets me do that and it eliminates a lot of that ladder climbing that is required if I do it on the trailer.

Offline Bob23

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Re: Tunning the standing rig
« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2017, 06:48:36 PM »
Brack, thanks! I rig the boat on the trailer but leave the final tuning until she's sitting in her slip. I do have a Loos gauge but have not used it so this is perfect timing. Sort of...as I plan to haul her out in a few weeks, put her winter pj's on and tuck her away for a long winter's sleep.

Offline curtisv

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Re: Tunning the standing rig
« Reply #7 on: October 25, 2017, 04:09:59 PM »
Brack, thanks! I rig the boat on the trailer but leave the final tuning until she's sitting in her slip. I do have a Loos gauge but have not used it so this is perfect timing. Sort of...as I plan to haul her out in a few weeks, put her winter pj's on and tuck her away for a long winter's sleep.

I find that over the course of the season the rig get looser.  Might be the hull continues to settle after getting off the trailer and into the water.  Sometimes I notice it and ignore it.  Sometime I retune.

Also don't forget to loosen the whole rig before hauling.  Otherwise as the hull weight sits on the keel on the trailer rather than on the buoyancy a lot of stress is put on the rigging and also on the cabin top where the mast is stepped.

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Offline Bob23

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Re: Tunning the standing rig
« Reply #8 on: October 25, 2017, 06:45:53 PM »
Thanks, Curtis! I never thought of loosening the rig but it makes perfect sense. Thanks again!!
Yes, my rig seems to loosen up as the season progresses. I choose not to think about it too much.

Offline AislinGirlII

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Re: Tunning the standing rig
« Reply #9 on: November 15, 2017, 04:21:14 PM »
Bob, I didn't think about it but I did do it in the water.  I've found it is easier to put my mast up after launching while in the water.  I generally launch and motor over to my slip before raising.  My system lets me do that and it eliminates a lot of that ladder climbing that is required if I do it on the trailer.

Brackish, after reading the line about climbing around on the trailer and ladders, I stepped my mast in the slip this time as well. Decided as clumsy as I've been lately I'd rather fall a few feet into the water rather than 6 feet to the parking lot ! Fortunately I stayed aboard the whole time, but this is a bit more carefree !

Offline deisher6

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Re: Tunning the standing rig
« Reply #10 on: November 16, 2017, 09:55:34 AM »
Very interesting thread, thanks for posting....

On a C-27 there is considerable difference in the rigging tension from the hard to in the water.  I tighten the rigging after it has set for at least a day.  There is also some difference in engine shaft alignment.

Last time I tuned by feel and keeping the mast straight.  It worked for two years but the leeward lowers were slack when on a hard beat.  This time I tuned by counting the threads, feel, keeping the mast straight and tried to go a bit tighter.  Noticed that the forward leeward lower is just a might slack close hauled.  It seems to work.  The mast does not work when not under load in a seaway.

However you have me thinking.

Smooth Sailing

regards charlie