Author Topic: The start of a new adventure  (Read 9465 times)

Offline Nicolina

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Re: The start of a new adventure
« Reply #45 on: September 06, 2013, 04:57:07 PM »
Wes: I just ordered my Debond marine formula. Thanks for the hint; I hope I'll manage to get the stuff off!

Offline Wes

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Re: The start of a new adventure
« Reply #46 on: September 06, 2013, 05:00:23 PM »
The Ways of Hutchins can be mysterious indeed. My 1988 CP19 had 5200 everywhere, all of which I removed to the considerable profit of the Debond Corporation. However my 1988 CP27 had 5200 in some locations (deck hardware, Bomar hatches) and some other kind of flesh colored sealant (maybe a polysulfide, like Lifecaulk?) in others (teak coaming tops, companionway sliders, most other exterior teak). Luckily, to paraphrase the now famous Honey Badger (ok, look it up on YouTube), Debond Marine Formula "don't give a s**t." It happily eats it all.

On the 19 I rebedded with 4200, which worked fine although it makes quite a mess. Still a few months away from reassembling the 27, but leaning to butyl tape. I found the detailed instructions on the Compass Marine blog to be very convincing. We shall see.

Wes
"Sophie", 1988 CP 27/2 #74
"Bella", 1988 CP 19/3 #453
Bath, North Carolina

Offline MacGyver

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Re: The start of a new adventure
« Reply #47 on: September 06, 2013, 10:07:39 PM »
After rebedding the 19 all in butyl tape, I am sold..... and that was a hard sell. I dont have a single leak, and was really careful how I sealed them up.
Only drawback, after dressing it all up, the heat caused a little more to squeeze out, but all will be well once I get to cleaning it back up when she is pulled.

Mac
Former Harbor Master/Boat Tech, Certified in West System, Interlux, and Harken products.
Works on ALL aspects of the sailboat, 14 years experience.
"I wanted freedom, open air and adventure. I found it on the sea."
-Alaine Gerbault.

Offline Wes

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Re: The start of a new adventure
« Reply #48 on: September 15, 2013, 08:16:54 AM »
Sanding weekend! Using a guide coat of aerosol black lacquer to see where I'm going and where I've been. Works great - kudos to the brilliant Don Davis for this idea. Otherwise sanding a white hull in the blazing sun is, like, snow blindness, dude.

So excited - soon will come primer, meaning the dreaded brown stripe will be gone. I hate that thing. What were they thinking? Who walks into a sailboat dealer and says "hey, how much extra for the awesome brown stripe?"

Wes

"Sophie", 1988 CP 27/2 #74
"Bella", 1988 CP 19/3 #453
Bath, North Carolina

Offline Harrier

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Re: The start of a new adventure
« Reply #49 on: September 15, 2013, 08:22:56 AM »
slick idea with the paint.

Hey Wes, any tips on taking up the hand rails.  I'd like to bring my home for the winter to refinish, but I'm afraid of breaking them in the process.  What worked best, prying from up top? Tapping from down below?  Were they bedded with the 5200?
Thanks

Offline Wes

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Re: The start of a new adventure
« Reply #50 on: September 15, 2013, 09:02:25 AM »
On both my 19 and 27, the handrails came off easily after removing the nuts below. Just wiggled them off, gently pulling from above. I do not suggest tapping from below, since you will likely drive out the teak plugs.

Mine were bedded in polysulfide which released easily. God help you if yours are bedded in 5200. If so I would give them several applications of Debond from above, while gently working a thin putty knife under each contact point. Patience, grasshopper.

Don't ask me for advice on removing the eyebrows though. Have never successfully gotten them off without breakage - they are incredibly delicate. For the 19 I bought a new set from Hutchins. For the 27 the new ones are extremely expensive, so I'm going to make a new set myself. Even so it will be expensive - teak is running $22/board foot.



"Sophie", 1988 CP 27/2 #74
"Bella", 1988 CP 19/3 #453
Bath, North Carolina

Offline MacGyver

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Re: The start of a new adventure
« Reply #51 on: September 15, 2013, 03:44:41 PM »
Teak is running 22$ a board foot...... that is cheap!
I paid 32 for 4/4 and 36 for 8/4 finished 3 sides

where you buying your teak at?

Mac
Former Harbor Master/Boat Tech, Certified in West System, Interlux, and Harken products.
Works on ALL aspects of the sailboat, 14 years experience.
"I wanted freedom, open air and adventure. I found it on the sea."
-Alaine Gerbault.

Offline captainvince

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Re: The start of a new adventure
« Reply #52 on: September 16, 2013, 08:50:57 PM »
Congrads Wes ,About your 10 hp uni des, my 27 seemed a little slow so I talked quite a few times with the techs at Westerbeke and decided to reprop her .

She had a 12x9 two blade ,they recomended a12x11 ,I found a used 12x12 two blade and installed it .The engine ,the boat and I really like it .She moves very nicely and easily now. Has anyone else done this ? Also if you do not have a engine manual they are available .That is a sweet little power plant .

Congrads Again & Good Luck ,Captain Vince

Offline Wes

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Re: The start of a new adventure
« Reply #53 on: September 16, 2013, 09:35:03 PM »
Mac - haven't actually bought any yet, but the boys at the boatyard are recommending World Panel Products, www.worldpanel.com, because they specialize in marine wood products and their NC location is just 30 min. from here. They have teak lumber as well as veneer plywood. I like the idea of picking out my boards in person.

Vince - that's a cool idea. Where did you find a used prop? I do have the original 12x9 as you did. Already thinking of replacement because I fear I have some galvanic damage, but hadn't thought of a different pitch.

Wes
"Sophie", 1988 CP 27/2 #74
"Bella", 1988 CP 19/3 #453
Bath, North Carolina

Offline captainvince

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Re: The start of a new adventure
« Reply #54 on: September 18, 2013, 11:30:06 PM »
Wes ,I was very lucky ,I went the local prop shop and was going to have them recondition and twist my 12x9 to 12 x11 . I asked where a guy might find a used prop like I wanted ? They have couple of shelves full and we found the 12x12 with the correct shaft size & tapper ! They buffed, trued,& balanced it all for $250,lucky me,eh. The shop is here in Port Clinton OH called Menderman Marine Products  phone # 419-732-2626 .

If I can help in any way let me know. Vince

Offline Koinonia

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Re: The start of a new adventure
« Reply #55 on: September 26, 2013, 11:49:47 AM »
Ebay can be a great source for props if your not in a hurry, I got a few laying around the house as door stops that I picked up for 10 to 20 dollars.  I got the 3 blade prop for my M25XP install for 75 dollars and later for my large two blade that I havnt tried yet for 20 bucks.

Offline brackish

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Re: The start of a new adventure
« Reply #56 on: September 26, 2013, 12:06:56 PM »
Teak is running 22$ a board foot...... that is cheap!
I paid 32 for 4/4 and 36 for 8/4 finished 3 sides

where you buying your teak at?

Mac

After I could not find a stick of teak while in Panama City, FL in June, but was quoted $30/bdft. if they had it, I was up in Memphis getting some Lacquer and retarder and asked where I might find teak there.  Guy at the Valspar wood store give me a couple of places to look, and the last place had African Teak.  Unlike the farm raised teak that is junk as far as I'm concerned, this stuff looked just like the old growth Asian Teak I'm used to.  Same grain, very slightly lighter color tone.  I bought an 8/4 rough board to try it out.  It was $14/bdft.  Anyone use African teak before?  I'm planning to make a set of eyebrows from it and also a laminated rub rail for a skiff I'm building.

Offline Koinonia

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Re: The start of a new adventure
« Reply #57 on: September 26, 2013, 07:31:34 PM »
just be sure to have fresh blades when sawing, especially if using it on a table saw to made those long thin eyebrows.  I get all my exotic woods from a place within an hour of my house called East Teak, our of Donalds SC.   Prices vary depending on what you want and if you want it rough cut or finish cut.  They also have plywood in various woods as well.  If people are looking for teak and holly they have that as well, I dont have their number but a google search will bring them up.

Offline Koinonia

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Re: The start of a new adventure
« Reply #58 on: November 01, 2013, 08:04:51 PM »
Any updates? Pictures?

Offline Wes

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Re: The start of a new adventure
« Reply #59 on: February 19, 2014, 09:46:05 PM »
This is what we do when it's too cold to go sailing even here in temperate NC, and when we have a house full of teak trim. Not much progress being made at the boatyard, but things are in high gear at home. My wife is a saint to give up the kitchen every week from Friday evening until Sunday afternoon

After considerable hand-wringing I'm going with Helmsman spar varnish this time. Ten coats, first two thinned, sanded with 400 grit after every coat. First eight coats gloss, last two satin. Based on experience gained on my previous project (Bella), Cetol is easier (less sanding) but I have found it fails more precipitously (black spots) if not kept well maintained. The Helmsman fails more forgivingly - just gets duller with time.

All these pieces are original (1988) and were sanded back to life; some epoxy patching of minor holes and chipped corners. The ones that will need to be plugged after installation are just getting one sealer coat on the exposed side, with the remainder applied on the boat. Otherwise sanding down the plugs would take off too much varnish. These pieces get six coats on the backside - the side that will be bedded against the boat.

Pieces not requiring plugging (drop boards, tray table, bowsprit etc.) get the full ten-coat treatment on all sides. For the handrails (11 through-bolts and teak plugs each) I'm taking a risk and pre-plugging them so I can finish them at home with bolts in place. Bolts were epoxied in place so they won't rotate when tightened down. I couldn't face the prospect of all that masking and sanding on the boat.



"Sophie", 1988 CP 27/2 #74
"Bella", 1988 CP 19/3 #453
Bath, North Carolina