Author Topic: Eclipse.... First Sailboat  (Read 3504 times)

Offline TR2020

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Eclipse.... First Sailboat
« on: April 23, 2005, 08:05:04 PM »
Hello…   I am fairly new to sailing and recently purchased my first boat, a Com-Pac Eclipse.  How fortunate I was to have bought this fine vessel as my first sailboat. Although I have nothing to compare with (I had never been on a sailboat prior) my Eclipse seems to be sturdy, safe, easy to launch (20 min), and perhaps a little forgiving for a novice sailor.  I have sailed mostly on Lake Monroe (10,00 acres) in Central Florida.  My sailing time has been limited due to business travel but I hope to retire soon and do more sailing and exploring with my trailersailor.  

Best thing I bought for my boat aside from a Honda outboard is a Raymarine ST1000 tiller pilot.  This device has increased my enjoyment of sailing 100% as it allows freedom to move about, adjust sails, and get beer from the cabin cooler while underway. My next purchases will be a depth sounder, bimini top, cockpit cushions, and a better anchor.  I would like to hear from other Eclipse owners as to their choices for these items.  Also any special sailing techniques and tales of adventure encountered in your Eclipse.

Tim

Offline Craig Weis

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New Eclipse and new to sailing.
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2005, 08:13:08 AM »
skip here,
TR2020 very pleased that the Com-Pac Eclipse is filling the need to sail.
I don't think a better boat can be had [no wood, just micro balloons between the layers of glass] because nothing can rot and become soft.
 
I sail a Com-Pac 19. The 19 was still in production when I bought my boat.
The Eclipse was only in the minds of Rich Hutchins and crew and I think overall it's a winner.

Lake Monroe, [edit your post] is it 1,000 or 10,000 acres?
 
The limited amounts of electronics on my boat is an ST 40 Bi-Data insturment and just last Sunday I ordered a 435i Chartplotter and C-map chip for the Great Lakes. These are Raymarine units [I like to stick in the same family] and with my UHF radio, LED cabin lights, and running lights and stereo I have reached the end of my battery power [1000 CCA] even with a solar cell trickle charge.

The ST 1000 tiller pilot is a good addition if you have the power to drive it. The Honda motor can recharge the battery I guess. A bimini top is a must in Florida, Dad used one on his boat when living in Florida. The sun is going to just chew up that boat unless it is waxed and waxed and waxed.

Cockpit cushions are made by a few companies and as long as they resist UV and are not open cell foam ought to be good. Store them inside when not in use. Go to the nearest ALL SAILBOAT SHOW in your area in 'winter'.

As for ground tackle I made a quick disconnect pin that goes through a hole I drilled in the shank of my Danforth anchor. The pin additionally goes through an existing hole in the stainless steel something or other at the bow of my Com-Pac. I think this SS piece was used  for the 'tack' of the lapper/jib/foward sail. Additionally I fly a SailEast spinnaker.

My boat has the bow sprit with Harken furler so the SS piece is left unused making a great place to hang and pin the Danforth out over the bow sprit on it's anchor roller. Finish this system off wih a nice coated chain and three strand nylon line with shackles [note that the shackle will not go down the rope pipe].  I use 150 foot and I tie the line to the compression post and run it between the vee birth cushions to the rope locker and up through the rope pipe on deck. When anchoring I reverse my 5 hp Mercury and chug backwards dead slow. I just pull the pin, lower the anchor, play out the line, cleat it off when my 100 foot tape mark pops out of the rope pipe and let her swing.

For just a lunch anchor I have a smaller blue plastic coated Danforth with about 50 foot of line that can be tossed over the stern and cleat it off. I keep that under the cockpit seat lid. This can be seen in 'skips pics' below.

What ever you do, DO NOT HANG ANY ANCHOR FROM THE BOW PULPIT. This pratice is just going to snag and tear any sail.

I don't do any beer on board just water and juice and fruit.
skip.

Pearler

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Eclipse.... First Sailboat
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2005, 10:15:16 PM »
Hi Tim,

I'm also a new owner of an Eclipse. We have had our Eclipse for 3 wks. and just tried her out last wk. end on a trip to Cayo Costa. We were pleased with the way the Eclipse sailed. I spend the first two weeks after I got her home upgrading. Here is a list of the upgrades.

1. Installed a fixed VHF radio ( Antenna is rail mounted on boom arch )
2. Installed bulkhead compass ( Plastimo Mini Contest)
3. Added Dogger ( Custom made and installed by dealer )
4. Installed Depth / Speed Meter ( Raymarine ST40 Bidata System )
5. Added a prop guard to motor ( Power Thruster )
6. Cover for the Genoa ( Custom made )
7. Add Anchor ( CQR 10lb ) Also have small Danforth for lunch anchor

Offline TR2020

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New Eclipse and new to sailing
« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2005, 11:43:47 PM »
Skip,  thanks for the suggestions.  In viewing your boat I can see that it is very similar to the Eclipse except for the transom.  I really haven’t experienced any problems with the no transom situation.  However, it would be real easy to lose something out of the cockpit if you aren’t careful.  Today I was sailing in some choppy, windy weather and I noticed on a beam reach when the boat heeled a little too much that water sometimes sloshed up over the stern into the cockpit.  This did not seem to happen on a run(the boat just rose up as the waves passed under). It may be due to the fact that I have too much weight in the rear (110 lb outboard) and me 200 lbs.  Anyway it sure will be easy to get in and out of this summer when swimming and snorkeling.  

Lake Monroe according to the State of Florida is 9406 acres…. About 4.5 miles long and 3.5 miles wide.  The St. Johns river flows North through the lake.  It’s about as far South on the river as any sizeable sailboat can travel with mast up.  It’s all fresh water on this end but becomes salty 150 miles north where it empties into the Atlantic at Jacksonville.

I am using a Garmin Handheld GPS 60cs for navigation purposes.  I attached this to be bottom hatch board, which I leave in when sailing.  It  communicates with the tiller pilot. Also it is very useful in my car when traveling.  I haven’t purchased a compass yet…  the GPS has a digital compass… but only sailing in the lake I really haven’t utilized this stuff yet.  The GPS says I traveled 25 NM today and my max speed was 7.5 kt..  I don’t think this boat goes this fast.. must be bouncing over a wave for a few seconds as most of the time I was making 4.5 to 5.5 kts.  I spent some time beating into the wind for practice.  I was surprised I made as much forward progress as I did.  I had the main reefed and the genoa out about 2/3rds..  I left the centerboard down on the close reaches..  I noticed sometimes water squirts up through the tube at the cleat.  This runs out through the no transom… and I guess in your boat it would go out through the scuppers.
The pictures on the SCA yahoo site were very interesting.  Sailing Lake Michigan, 35 degree water temp, cold weather, 10 or 20 miles offshore…   a lot different than my limited lake sailing.  I bet it’ll be nice this summer though, when its 96 deg in FL with thunderstorms every afternoon it will probably quite pleasant in your sailing area.  Would like to hear about the almost knockdown  “Just sailing on the lapper” photo.

Tim

Jim Fynes

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Question about the power thruster
« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2005, 08:19:41 AM »
Pearler,  what is your opinion of the power thruster so far. I have the 2hp Honda on my Picnic Cat and while it is adequate, I was wondering whether it would be worthwhile to add the power thruster.   Jim

AT

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Re: Eclipse.... First Sailboat
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2005, 02:43:01 PM »
Quote from: TR2020
Best thing I bought for my boat aside from a Honda outboard is a Raymarine ST1000 tiller pilot.  This device has increased my enjoyment of sailing 100% as it allows freedom to move about, adjust sails, and get beer from the cabin cooler while underway. My next purchases will be a depth sounder, bimini top, cockpit cushions, and a better anchor.  I would like to hear from other Eclipse owners as to their choices for these items.  Also any special sailing techniques and tales of adventure encountered in your Eclipse.

Tim


Tim,

I used to have an ST1000+ autopilot on my previous boat. It worked very well for 2 seasons, then a drive belt stripped teeth and had to be replaced (under warrantee). The autopilot is a very helpful thing and I am going to get one for the Eclipse, only I am thinking ST2000+ with improved drive mechanism. BTW, did you have to install a pedestal mound or a tiller bracket to align the autopilot horizontally?

I never had a depth sounder and never really needed it. Maybe I will add one at some time later, but I don’t want to drill the hull so the transducer has to be “shoot through the hull” type. I also don’t want to drill the bulkhead to install the instrument. Perhaps it can go on one of those access plates in the aft.

A bimini top is a number one necessity. You can order one from Com-Pac and install it in under half hour. It has only one bow that attaches to the arch. The bow telescopes and the rear end of canvas snaps to the blocks on the arch. Considering the arch, it is probably the most efficient way to add a bimini top to the Eclipse.

I bough cockpit cushions in West Marine. It is a kind that folds and works like a reclining seat. Only used them once so far, but they seem to be quite comfortable and convenient. I think I am going to like them.

I am using 11# Bruce clone (brand name Claw) for an anchor. It works well in most conditions except very deep grass. If there is a lot of grass where you sail, Delta is a better choice. I have Danforth as a spare anchor. It is a good idea to have at least two anchors on a boat. Actually, I have three, the third one is for a tender and can also serve as a lunch hook or a second anchor to hold the chain down in a strong wind.

A.T.

Offline Craig Weis

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Skip's Knock Down Story
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2005, 11:00:57 PM »
TR 2020
A 110 lb outboard is one heck of a churn! My 5 hp Merc is about 48 lb and pushes the 2000 lb C-P 19 along at 4.5~4.7 knts. according to my Raymarine ST 40 Bi Data unit. BTW it is only 2~2" dia holes about 6 to 8 inches in front of my keel and on either side of the centerline of the hull. Ahhhhh you do need to cut a 16" x 16" access panel out of the vee birth in front of the compression post. Goop the threads up with lots of 3-M 5200 slow cure and pop these two thingys in the holes with the and have your assistant screw down the big plastic nuts with gaskets hand tight and your done. Becareful that the speedo/knot/mile per hour paddle wheel faces bow and stern wise. This is a very nice unit that is easy on power requirements.

For years ever since I have been sailing my C-P 19 I have been trying to put the rail in the water. Well as per photos it happened. My sister-in-law, Georgiann and I were out in choppy seas in a very 40 to 50 knt wind with guests that made the standing rigging sing! With just the 155% lapper fully deployed she was cutting along at 4.4 ~5.6 knts and we were way out in the middle of Green Bay in about 110 foot of water.
 
I could see it coming, that big hit of wind as it blew the tops off the waves and it slammed us hard resulting in a rail down and under thrill ride. For a mini second I was in a panic but I realized that control and feed back from the Idasailor foiled rudder, I don't think I could have done this with the flat plate rudder without loss of control and rounding up into the wind, was still forthcoming, and I was in the trough of the waves as water rushed up over the settee, down the cockpit side to the cockpit sole under our feet and disappeared under the gas tank cover where the scuppers are to be found. We probably shipped about a "10 inch thick wave of green foamy water for a good 45 seconds".

Under these conditions I had my knife with it's landard around my wrist and was begining to think about cutting the lapper sheet since I was not able to release it from the cleat when the gust died away and we righted to a more normal for this day indicated 25 deg list as per compass incline meter. The dropboard bottom piece was in place with the companion way fully closed and tied to keep it from opening.

It was a great ride, just about the same way I sailed dad's Star boat as a gradeschool/highschool kid out of Belmont Harbor, Chicago. With the top part of the dropboard not in place I could see the water rushing past the dogged down port holes of the cabin.

Wow, it was great. Georgiann paniced for a moment till she realized I was laughing my butt off. Then she was enjoying the ride and hanging on. To be trueful I don't think the top of the mast ever got less than 18 foot above the horizion or waves if they were flat calm. A story on another Com-Pac site has a sailor claiming that his mast lay only 10 foot above the water in an Alaska knock-down.

skip.

Offline TR2020

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Eclipse.... First Sailboat
« Reply #7 on: April 26, 2005, 09:54:44 PM »
Quote from: Pearler
Hi Tim,

I'm also a new owner of an Eclipse. We have had our Eclipse for 3 wks. and just tried her out last wk. end on a trip to Cayo Costa. We were pleased with the way the Eclipse sailed. I spend the first two weeks after I got her home upgrading. Here is a list of the upgrades.

1. Installed a fixed VHF radio ( Antenna is rail mounted on boom arch )
2. Installed bulkhead compass ( Plastimo Mini Contest)
3. Added Dogger ( Custom made and installed by dealer )
4. Installed Depth / Speed Meter ( Raymarine ST40 Bidata System )
5. Added a prop guard to motor ( Power Thruster )
6. Cover for the Genoa ( Custom made )
7. Add Anchor ( CQR 10lb ) Also have small Danforth for lunch anchor


Hi Pearler,

Glad you are enjoying your new boat.

 I was considering the Plastimo compass… it looks to be just about the right size.  My wife doesn’t want any holes drilled but it’s inevitable if you want to set things up right.  I was wondering where you mounted yours and how you hooked up power.  Does it interfere much with someone leaning back against the bulkhead?  
 
The power thruster seems like a good idea.  Never knew I needed that but after looking at the advt. I don’t know how I thought I could get along without one. I’ve already nicked my rudder with the outboard.  

Do you carry your anchor on the bowsprit?  If so how do you attach and release?

Tim

Offline TR2020

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Re: Eclipse.... First Sailboat
« Reply #8 on: April 26, 2005, 10:00:59 PM »
Quote from: AT
Quote from: TR2020
Best thing I bought for my boat aside from a Honda outboard is a Raymarine ST1000 tiller pilot.  This device .

Tim


Tim,

I used to have an ST1000+ autopilot on my previous boat. It worked very well for 2 seasons, then a drive belt stripped teeth and had to be replaced (under warrantee). The autopilot is a very helpful thing and I am going to get one for the Eclipse, only I am thinking ST2000+ with improved drive mechanism. BTW, did you have to install a pedestal mound or a tiller bracket to align the autopilot horizontally?

I never had a depth sounder and never really needed it. Maybe I will add one at some time later, but I don’t want to drill the hull so the transducer has to be “shoot through the hull” type. I also don’t want to drill the bulkhead to install the instrument. Perhaps it can go on one of those access plates in the aft.

A bimini top is a number one necessity. You can order one from Com-Pac and install it in under half hour. It has only one bow that attaches to the arch. The bow telescopes and the rear end of canvas snaps to the blocks on the arch. Considering the arch, it is probably the most efficient way to add a bimini top to the Eclipse.

I bough cockpit cushions in West Marine. It is a kind that folds and works like a reclining seat. Only used them once so far, but they seem to be quite comfortable and convenient. I think I am going to like them.

I am using 11# Bruce clone (brand name Claw) for an anchor. It works well in most conditions except very deep grass. If there is a lot of grass where you sail, Delta is a better choice. I have Danforth as a spare anchor. It is a good idea to have at least two anchors on a boat. Actually, I have three, the third one is for a tender and can also serve as a lunch hook or a second anchor to hold the chain down in a strong wind.

A.T.


A.T.

I think your choice of the ST2000+ tiller pilot is a good choice…  I believe it has a quicker reaction time than the 1000 and as you say has a more reliable mechanism. I mounted the ST1000 to the starboard inspection plate opening. My wife fashioned a piece of oak wood the same dimensions as the inspection cover with an arm trailing towards the stern. The mounting socket is seated in this arm.  A hole was drilled in the center of the inspection plate area to run the cabling.  Took a little trial and error to get things lined up… and the whole thing could be off slightly, but everything seems to work fine.  No holes drilled in the boat.  I can post a picture of this if you are interested.

The factory bimini looks a little small…. But I guess I might give it a try.

I think the bruce type anchor might be my choice…  will sometimes have to anchor in a muddy lake bottom.

Good luck in your sailing adventures.  Biscayne Bay and the Keys look to be a great place for sailing.

I noticed your post about a trip to the Dry Tortugas…   please take a camera along and give a report…  

Tim

Offline TR2020

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Re: Skip's Knock Down Story
« Reply #9 on: April 26, 2005, 10:04:11 PM »
Quote from: skip
TR 2020
A 110 lb outboard is one heck of a churn! My 5 hp Merc is about 48 lb and pushes the 2000 lb C-P 19 along at 4.5~4.7 knts. according to my Raymarine ST 40 Bi Data unit. BTW it is only 2~2" dia holes about 6 to 8 inches in front of my keel and on either side of the centerline of the hull. Ahhhhh you do need to cut a 16" x 16" access panel out of the vee birth in front of the compression post. Goop the threads up with lots of 3-M 5200 slow cure and pop these two thingys in the holes with the and have your assistant screw down the big plastic nuts with gaskets hand tight and your done. Becareful that the speedo/knot/mile per hour paddle wheel faces bow and stern wise. This is a very nice unit that is easy on power requirements.

For years ever since I have been sailing my C-P 19 I have been trying to put the rail in the water. Well as per photos it happened. My sister-in-law, Georgiann and I were out in choppy seas in a very 40 to 50 knt wind with guests that made the standing rigging sing! With just the 155% lapper fully deployed she was cutting along at 4.4 ~5.6 knts and we were way out in the middle of Green Bay in about 110 foot of water.
 
I could see it coming, that big hit of wind as it blew the tops off the waves and it slammed us hard resulting in a rail down and under thrill ride. For a mini second I was in a panic but I realized that control and feed back from the Idasailor foiled rudder, I don't think I could have done this with the flat plate rudder without loss of control and rounding up into the wind, was still forthcoming, and I was in the trough of the waves as water rushed up over the settee, down the cockpit side to the cockpit sole under our feet and disappeared under the gas tank cover where the scuppers are to be found. We probably shipped about a "10 inch thick wave of green foamy water for a good 45 seconds".

Under these conditions I had my knife with it's landard around my wrist and was begining to think about cutting the lapper sheet since I was not able to release it from the cleat when the gust died away and we righted to a more normal for this day indicated 25 deg list as per compass incline meter. The dropboard bottom piece was in place with the companion way fully closed and tied to keep it from opening.

It was a great ride, just about the same way I sailed dad's Star boat as a gradeschool/highschool kid out of Belmont Harbor, Chicago. With the top part of the dropboard not in place I could see the water rushing past the dogged down port holes of the cabin.

Wow, it was great. Georgiann paniced for a moment till she realized I was laughing my butt off. Then she was enjoying the ride and hanging on. To be trueful I don't think the top of the mast ever got less than 18 foot above the horizion or waves if they were flat calm. A story on another Com-Pac site has a sailor claiming that his mast lay only 10 foot above the water in an Alaska knock-down.

skip.


Skip,
Hey…   what an adventure!  Better than NASCAR racing. Heeled over with water rushing through the cockpit…. Panic city!

 I notice in the Eclipse that when hit with a good gust the boat rounds up into the wind.  The rudder just seems to plow through the water till the boat levels up. I presently view this tendency as a safety feature.  

I understand the desire to go out in really windy conditions.  To me this is another part of sailing…  the part where your adrenalin gets pumping and you get totally focused and aware. I like to feel a little spray stinging (if its warm spray).

Tim

Offline Craig Weis

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Drilling holes!!! PLASTEMO COMPASS
« Reply #10 on: April 26, 2005, 11:13:34 PM »
TR2020HO~UP a moment you guys.
[You might be able to see this in some of my boat pics below].

Instead of hacking out a huge hole through the outer bulkhead for a compass, and than realizing that an additional hole is needed [maybe] in the inner cabin bulkhead just to 'bury' the compass flush with the outer bulkhead....and no the crew can't lean against the bulkhead at this spot.

Why not use are heads and consider this...

Take a chunk of teak, I pulled mine from Palmer Johnson Yachts' garbage bin for wood,

~cut the teak round and a little bigger then the compass. Big enough so the screw pattern of the compass 'rests' over wood. And round enough so the compass fits flush on the ring of teak. [see two ~'s down].

~Now on my boat it was necessary to cut a hole for the back of the compass into the outer cabin bulkhead...BUT NOT THE INNER BULKHEAD, using this 'stand-off teak ring. That's why we use the ring of teak! Nobody wants to look at the back of the compass from inside the cabin.

~carefully cut out the center of this chunk the size of the compass.

~From the hardware store buy 3-small wood screw one end/machine screw other end thingys with nuts and predrill the teak for the wood screw ends. Drive the wood screws with back to back jammed nuts on the machine screw end into the wood. Don't crack anything. Predrill big enough holes. I put a drop of epoxy in the wood end so it stays put too.

~With the machine screws sticking out of backside of teak ring dab a little paint on the machine screws and just touch the outer bulkhead right where you think you want the compass mounted. Clean the threads of paint after marking...drill the bulkhead and file to fit back of compass.

~Drill tiny little holes for the machine screws through the outer bulkhead and you can place the washers, start the nuts and tighten nuts through the compass hole in the bulkhead before mounting the compass.

ORrrrrrrrrrrrr without a compass hole in the outer bulkhead...that's way too thick a piece of wood and looks out of proportion hanging out here on the bulkhead.

~Becareful! Make sure you can slip a washer and nut on these threads by reaching up between the outer and inner bulkheads. I can do it on my C-P 19 I don't know about the Eclipse. CHECK CHECK CHECK before drilling.

You need to keep the boat as hole free as possible. And for wireing the red compass light, take red and black 18 ga wire long enough to do the job, place the two wires in a vice on the bench or? whatever and streach the two wires out evenly and tought. Now put the end you are holding into a drill and spin the wire till they almost double wrap. Stop. Put the switch far away and wire and cut off the excess and the compass will not be influenced by the D/C voltage in the wires at night when the lite is on. I twisted up 25 foot, cut off what I didn't need.

THINK! skip.

AT

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Re: Eclipse.... First Sailboat
« Reply #11 on: April 27, 2005, 10:06:59 AM »
Quote from: TR2020

I can post a picture of this if you are interested.

The factory bimini looks a little small….
[/b]


Yes, please post a picture, it will be very helpful to all Eclipse owners.

The factory bimini does look small, but it actually is almost perfect size. I wouldn't want it to protrude further forward, for it would prevent me from going from cockpit to foredeck. It could be extended aft,  probably the way Hunter does it, but then it would prevent me from standing up behind the arch, which is a very convenient and useful feature. I don't think you can have a simple aftermarket solution that would work better than the existing design.

Pearler

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Eclipse.... First Sailboat
« Reply #12 on: April 27, 2005, 08:51:51 PM »
Quote from: TR2020




 I was considering the Plastimo compass… it looks to be just about the right size.  My wife doesn’t want any holes drilled but it’s inevitable if you want to set things up right.  I was wondering where you mounted yours and how you hooked up power.  Does it interfere much with someone leaning back against the bulkhead?  
 
The power thruster seems like a good idea.  Never knew I needed that but after looking at the advt. I don’t know how I thought I could get along without one. I’ve already nicked my rudder with the outboard.  

Do you carry your anchor on the bowsprit?  If so how do you attach and release?

Tim [/b]


Tim, I posted a few pictures at the site below. They show the front and back view of my compass. I like Skip's idea of making a spacer...why didn't I think of that? That way you wouldn't have to cut a hole in the cabin side. You can also see the additional fuse panel that I added. That's were I picked up the power for the compass light and I also powered the depth sounder from there. There's also pictures of my bimini top and dodger. As for the anchor, I keep it in a canvas bag until I need it. The rope and chain are stored in the anchor locker with the end of the chain wraped around the cleat and hooked with a shackle. I don't like the idea of trailering with the anchor on the roller, but I did sail with it there.

[http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCAPhotos/] PS-Look for photo under Terry

Offline TR2020

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Re: Eclipse.... First Sailboat
« Reply #13 on: April 27, 2005, 09:58:58 PM »
"Yes, please post a picture, it will be very helpful to all Eclipse owners."


A.T.

I though I had a better picture than this... had to trim this out of a larger photo.  Will try to get a better shot tommorow.  Picture is posted in cpyoa image gallery under "The New Eclipse".

Tim

Offline TR2020

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Eclipse.... First Sailboat
« Reply #14 on: April 27, 2005, 10:12:14 PM »
Quote from: Pearler
Quote from: TR2020




 
They show the front and back view of my compass. I like Skip's idea of making a spacer...why didn't I think of that? That way you wouldn't have to cut a hole in the cabin side. You can also see the additional fuse panel that I added. That's were I picked up the power for the compass light and I also powered the depth sounder from there. [http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCAPhotos/] PS-Look for photo under Terry


Terry.. Looks nice!
Hey... great place to mount fire extinguisher