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Author Topic: Pros and Cons on the Com-Pac 16 with CB  (Read 1746 times)
rbadick
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« on: June 02, 2005, 12:36:49 PM »

I'm considering buying a 2000 Com-Pac 16 with a center board.

The boat is in excellent shape and I just have some concern over the CB.

I'd like to get some comments (- or +) from sailors who have actual experience with using one.

I am not to worried about the maintenance requirements and understand you can always sail with it retracted.  

Do all the 16's after a certain date have a CB or was it an option?

Thanks for your replys in advance.

Bob
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Craig
Guest
« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2005, 06:04:20 PM »

Bob,

My 16 does not have a centerboard so I can't tell you how a 16 CB sails. It was reported that the CB is a very different boat. I believe that last of the 16s all had centerboards, but it  may have been an option because there are 16 XL models out there that do not have a centerboard. Email the factory and ask if the CB was originally an option or not. They are real good at responding.

My first boat had a centerboard. It was a Cape Dory 14 and I have sailed an O'Day 23 with a centerboard. I have to believe that the centerboard improves the VMG of the 16 dramatically. The centerboard on my Cape Dory most definitely clunked in its trunk when the winds got light and the boat bobbed in the waves. It was a lot quieter when fully retracted, but would till bang around a bit. Something to ask if you plan on overnighting. A banging centerboard would make sleeping difficult.

If I had the money I would add the CB to my 16. I liked the ability to change the trim of my Dory by raising and lowering the centerboard, and its VMG better than my 16. The centerboard would allow me to change to the closer sheeting arrangement for the foresail on the 16 CB.

Craig
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rbadick
Guest
« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2005, 07:37:22 AM »

Thanks for your reply.

I was more curious about if it was an option and the years and model numbers when it was in production.

I'm mostly interested in how it sails relative to the none CB boat. I've read some comments that it doesn't make a big difference in performance.

So I'm trying to determine if the extra baggage of the mechanizm etc. is worth it to achieve a questionable improvement in performance.

I've got my eye on a 1989 non CB boat for half the price of the 2000 CB boat.  Of course the 89 needs work and the 2000 only needs to be cleaned.  So I'd go for the 2000 to avoid the hassle of some restoration and fixing up the 89  but don't want to end up with a lemon of a design either.

Thanks
Bob
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Craig
Guest
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2005, 09:34:31 AM »

Bob,

You don't need to worry about getting a lemon of a design. Don't expect the non-centerboard 16 to point real close to the wind. That's not it's strong suit. But it is a good design and has many redeeming qualities.

Craig
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multimedia_smith
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« Reply #4 on: July 13, 2005, 05:58:05 AM »

I dealt with this exact dilemma when I was trying to decide between a brand new CB model V/S an older non CB model.  I remember having a conversation with Woodie at ComPac about it.  He asked me what I was using the boat for... Was I racing it?  I told him that I just wanted to sail around our local lake and perhaps take it coastal cruising in the Gulf.  I wasn't trying to hit a mark or particular point in the water.  He said that he owned an older 16 and they sailed just fine... and they raced them regularly against each other in Fla.  He also mentioned something that really hit home with me... "something else to break... something else to possibly leak or have to maintain".  After reading several posts on the Seward forum about centerboards falling out, flapping or knocking in their slots... and nightmare cable replacement stories... I decided on the simpler design of the older boat.  I bought an '88 and absolutely love it.
It sails upwing fine for me... I've never had any trouble making it back to the harbor...  it is a lot of fun and very little worry.
Good Luck
 Smiley
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1988 CP-16
Gil Weiss
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« Reply #5 on: July 13, 2005, 06:40:35 AM »

I own a 1990 with no CB. I do have the Idasailor foiled Rudder and I have adjusted the mast rake forward to minimize the weather helm. I have absolutely no problem with how the CP16 handles after these changes. I am glad I do not have a CB to deal with as it is just something else to cause a problem. Sailing with a shoal draft keel and no CB is a wonderful thing. The foiled rudder made a BIG difference in handling. Keeping things simple in boating is good.
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1983 CP 19 "Suo Gan"
(Hull #184)
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