Author Topic: Solo Sailing a Legacy?  (Read 11744 times)

Offline sea kayaker

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Re: Solo Sailing a Legacy?
« Reply #15 on: April 15, 2015, 08:38:09 PM »
I appreciate all the good perspectives on this thread. I sail a Legacy, jib and main halyard tails reach the cabin bulkhead and are readily accessible. I use the tiller extension referenced by Keougmi and love when I am single handing. I find in light air off setting it to the side on the seat will often hold the course briefly. I think I will experiment with the redneck tiller tamer bungee idea. I will also install a downhaul for the jib as it could replace my doing a jig on the foredeck when I bouse the jib down with a bungee so it will not refill and rise up again in the stay just when I don't want to have a foresail. Can anyone recommend a good simple downhaul design?
I have used a brail on my sprit rig that worked well but it's function is much different from a downhaul.

Offline capt_nemo

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Re: Solo Sailing a Legacy?
« Reply #16 on: April 15, 2015, 10:33:01 PM »
sea kayaker,

I've used Jib Downhauls on several sailboats and found them to be simple and very effective.

The simplest design, and the one you should try FIRST, consists of a light line attached to the head of the jib at the halyard shackle or the jib head grommet which then goes through a turning block at the stemhead on its way to the cockpit.

When of appropriate length and loose, the line proceeds up the forestay when the jib is hoisted and is then snugged down a bit so as not to fly all over the place and is then cleated off. When ready to douse the jib, simply uncleat the downhaul, release the jib halyard, and haul in on the downhaul to bring the jib quickly down to the deck. When all the way down cleat off again to keep the jib locked down to the foredeck.

There are other variations on the same theme which you may want to try later as you become more familiar with downhaul designs.

Hope this helps.

capt_nemo

Offline Winkle

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Re: Solo Sailing a Legacy?
« Reply #17 on: July 13, 2015, 04:55:00 PM »
Hi sea kayaker,
A jib down haul is a useful tool. One thing you might do is fasten it to the top piston hank, not the top of the headboard, or the halyard shackle. Sometimes the head will tip and bind; being attached just below the head avoids the problem.
Rod
Southern Gulf Islands, BC Canada
CP16: Bummer II (gone), CP19: 'Winkle (gone), C-Dory 16C (Luna)

Offline CayugaSailor

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Re: Solo Sailing a Legacy?
« Reply #18 on: November 23, 2016, 09:50:09 AM »
Bungee cords put out eyes and are banned on my boat. You can use a single line to use as a Cajun tiller tamer. Experiment with securing ends and number of turns around the tiller for the right tension and control. Enjoy!
2013 Com-Pac Legacy
Heave out and trice up

Offline Shawn

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Re: Solo Sailing a Legacy?
« Reply #19 on: November 23, 2016, 01:58:07 PM »
"However, I think I may need something to keep the tiller straight (and hopefully headed into the wind), while I run up  to the companionway hatch and pull up the mainsail halyard and then once I get control again, raise the jib halyard to start sailing."

What about going in the opposite order. Point into the wind and raise the jib. If you are falling off the wind with the jib still going up that is no big deal. When just the jib is up heave to and then raise the main with the mainsheet running free. Once the main is up you can fall off and be sailing.

You could take the main down the same way in heavier air. If you are in light air go on a run and drop the jib with it in the wind shadow from the main then point into the wind, let the boat stall and drop the main. As long as you get it down reasonably quickly you shouldn't even really need to watch the tiller much.

For dropping anchor take down the jib first and bag it to get it out of the way, stall the boat into the wind and drop anchor. The main will flap around but the anchor will keep you pointed into the wind. After you get set you can take down the main. To sail off the anchor raise the main. Again the anchor will keep you pointed into the wind and in irons. Get the anchor up and stowed and then start sailing on main alone. Tack and stall to get the jib up or if the wind is light raise the jib on a run with it shadowed by the main.

Shawn