Author Topic: Heave too, always good to learn something new.  (Read 6946 times)

Offline deisher6

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Re: Heave too, always good to learn something new.
« Reply #15 on: March 23, 2015, 10:36:51 AM »
Yep redfishNC, it works for a C-27:

Wes and I hove too in Windrunner yesterday.  We had a NOS Johnson 110 jib, a very old and tired Johnson main, 10-15 knots of wind and very little wave action.  The boat handled it very well and it was very easy to accomplish.  I think that reefing the main yesterday would have been easy to accomplish.

I have gathered (3) 110's, including the NOS one that will be the primary, so am having one of them cut down to a 90.  I look forward to seeing how that jib would heave too.

Thanks for all of your comments.  A great new skill for an old sailer.

regards charlie

Offline Citroen/Dave

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Re: Heave too, always good to learn something new.
« Reply #16 on: March 23, 2015, 11:12:33 AM »
Matt,

I was trying to depower a reefed main boat by dropping the jib.  I could not see how to keep any balance.  The obvious clue from the video was to drop the main and sail under the jib, alone.

Thanks for your help.

Dave
"You can't judge a skipper by the size of his dingy."
'85 ComPac 16/2  "Keep 'er Wet" renamed "Slow Dancing"

Offline peterg

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Re: Heave too, always good to learn something new.
« Reply #17 on: March 23, 2015, 05:32:41 PM »
The C19s and C27 I have owned hove-to wonderfully with the headsail totally furled and only the main up. If you want to heave to and reef the main at the same time, heave to with a back-winded foresail, totally ease the mainsheet, lash the tiller to maintain jib induced hoving, ease the main halyard and reef the main, trim the main after reefing is accomplished, and remain hove-to with two sails......we had to do this drill for ASA keelboat instructor certification and it works well.

Offline skip1930

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Re: Heave too, always good to learn something new.
« Reply #18 on: June 13, 2015, 09:59:36 AM »
I heave too on stormy days when I tire and go below on my CP-19 for a little nap. [I'm old]
Lash the tiller. Jam cleat the rest of the sheets.
Calm as could be on board.

skip.

Offline Sail4Fun

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Re: Heave too, always good to learn something new.
« Reply #19 on: October 31, 2015, 10:14:20 AM »
Actually you can! Each boat is a little different but essentially you head up close to the wind,ease out the sail to slow down, as an option you can ease the peak(gaff) halyard to de-power  (The amount may vary boat to boat), raise the centerboard, trim the sail as if to tack and tie off the helm to leeward. In essence the boat tries to tack but with a de-powered sail and little forward motion, cant and just stays in irons permanently.Some boats may need a little centerboard for balance. You just need to experiment.


Tried this yesterday on my Sun Cat with 10 knots and large 1 foot breaking waves (OK...its a lake!) but I was missing something.  I did very nice circles with the tiller tied hard to leeward.  Next time with the tiller only part way to leeward, it generally stayed hove to.  It still wasn't right.

When you say "ease out the sail", how were you doing that?  Apparently I'm not understanding the terminology.  I didn't change the peak (gaff) or loosen up (ease?) the boom sheets.  I kept the boom in the same position as if Close Hauled. 

I am trainable and I appreciate the patient help as I learn.

Rick

Offline Duckie

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Re: Heave too, always good to learn something new.
« Reply #20 on: October 31, 2015, 01:01:59 PM »
I don't know if you can do a proper heave to with a single sail.  I don't sail a catboat, but I do have a gaff rigged sloop.  In order to do a heave to manuver  you need the sails to work against each other with the rudder acting as a mediator.  I have learned that you can park a single sail rig by simply letting the sheet go.  the sail will wind vane and the boat should show its beam to the wind.  I don't know if that is trustworthy, but is might be worth a try.

Al

Offline Jon898

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Re: Heave too, always good to learn something new.
« Reply #21 on: November 01, 2015, 07:59:42 AM »
See pages 24 and 25 at this link: http://www.go-embedded.com/Sailingmanual.pdf

Offline captrank

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Re: Heave too, always good to learn something new.
« Reply #22 on: November 01, 2015, 07:12:33 PM »
I found the video of the man droping his main while hove to interesting. In my experience when you are hove to you are having the jib work against the main to help you gradually slide along. If I want to reef my main I use my lazy jacks to help me keep the main controlled as I partly lower it. It is of course best to reef BEFORE you find yourself in air heavy enough to require it.

Offline Duckie

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Re: Heave too, always good to learn something new.
« Reply #23 on: November 08, 2015, 08:30:31 AM »
I have single line jiffy reefing on my gaff sail.  I can reef it before the boat has a chance to drift out of irons.  I do it a bit different than  most with a Marconi rig, but it seems to work.  When I want to reef I put the boat in irons and haul in on the reef line while lifting the end of the boom with one hand.  This brings the clew up to the fully reefed position.  I then let the throat halyard down enough to let the tack pull down fully.  I can then cleat off the reef line and tighten the throat halyard.  I can carry on with just this, but I like to tie off the reef cringles if I can.  Otherwise, I will find a calm spot to do it or heave to with the reefed main and tidy up.  As you can imagine this all takes only a few seconds.  I have a topping lift on that rig, but by doing it this way I don't need it because the gaff is holding the sail up from the start.  I haven't tried reefing my CP this way yet, but I bet it will work just as well.

Al

Offline Mas

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Re: Heave too, always good to learn something new.
« Reply #24 on: April 25, 2016, 07:45:39 PM »
ok this is an old thread but a new question. Has anyone done this with a staysail? I assume it would work as well if not better than the jib as the center of effort is more aft and closer to effort of the main. if the genoa is furled and two reefs in the main then the staysail will more than likely be employed. Our little boat has a baby stay with a hayfield lever for the deck attachment. It remains removed otherwise so the genoa does not have to be walked over around the inner stay. Never sailed with a cutter rigged boat but will be soon.

Any thoughts on the old question with a twist?
S/V  'Mas'  87' CP16/2
S/V  'Interlude' 89' PSC31

Offline deisher6

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Re: Heave too, always good to learn something new.
« Reply #25 on: April 26, 2016, 09:35:33 AM »
Hey No Mas:
Good question.  I would bet on it working.  It sounds as if you would use it when you are out in a very windy day.  I would suspect on such a day the furled genoa would provide some forward windage to help out.

But if it were my boat I would try it on a 15-20 day to see if it works before I needed it to work. 

But hey you already  know that.  Post how it works out.

regards charlie

Offline Mas

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Re: Heave too, always good to learn something new.
« Reply #26 on: April 26, 2016, 08:44:22 PM »
Hey Charlie,

Thanx for the reply. Will be doing lots of sail configurations before they are needed. Learned that lesson the hard way on a smaller (CP16) and had a pretty interesting reach back to safe haven. Still married! Never did that again.

Will be sure to keep all posted, just gotta get her in the water after some overdue needs are finished. New boat to us but not a new boat.  :)
S/V  'Mas'  87' CP16/2
S/V  'Interlude' 89' PSC31

Offline deisher6

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Re: Heave too, always good to learn something new.
« Reply #27 on: April 27, 2016, 09:06:30 AM »
Hey No Mas:  Your response got me to wondering what you are sailing.  I have heard and seen a couple of older Tartan 30-34'ishs with the removable baby stay but not much else.....possibly a Island packet 27?

regards charlie

Offline Tim Gardner

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Re: Heave too, always good to learn something new.
« Reply #28 on: April 27, 2016, 06:05:06 PM »
No Mas is a CP23D, Charlie.

  TG
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Offline deisher6

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Re: Heave too, always good to learn something new.
« Reply #29 on: April 28, 2016, 09:15:58 AM »
Thanks Tim:  Is the baby stay a stock option on the 23D?  If so I wonder why?  Can you sail as a cutter?
regards charlie