Author Topic: Knife River to the Apostles  (Read 683 times)

Offline Rafici

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Knife River to the Apostles
« on: February 02, 2016, 08:17:18 PM »
As the snow keeps falling tonight as I sit at work, my mind tends to wander.  In a couple of weeks I will be dragging home a new to me '02 CP25 knowing full well unforeseen work shall surprise me. I can't help but ponder what adventures await me. One that I am seriously considering is trailering up to Knife River Mn. and sailing across the the Apostle Islands.  With a couple seasons experience on little lakes in Iowa and minimal chartering experience in the Grenadines am I out of my mind for considering this? I am positive I am for other reasons not yet related to sailing....

Offline Bob23

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Re: Knife River to the Apostles
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2016, 08:26:49 PM »
I'd say you'd be out of your mind for not considering it! Gather info, make sure you and the ship are ready then just go! Life's too darn short not to!

Offline Rafici

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Re: Knife River to the Apostles
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2016, 08:59:01 PM »
That's the sort of thinking I can get in line with

Offline NateD

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Re: Knife River to the Apostles
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2016, 08:24:31 AM »
I did that sail, but from the other direction. Trailered up to the Apostles, then sailed over to Knife River in a ComPac 23. I say "sail", but it was actually dead calm and we motored, Lake Superior like glass on the crossing from Apostles to Knife River and we were in shorts and t-shirts under the bimini staying cool. However, the next day we sailed back to the Apostles and the conditions were pretty gnarly with a double reef in the main and only a scrap of jib rolled out. We had full foul weather gear, stocking hats and gloves on and there was too much weather helm for the autopilot to handle. There were a couple of mayday calls from kayakers in the Apostles, but we were too far away to help. We sailed from Knife River to Stockton island in something like 6 hours, it was a heck of a ride.

The knife river marina is new and nice. When we were up there the water was so clear you could see the very large boulders 30 feet down. Scarred the crap out of me, I was afraid of hitting one, but I checked the guide book, and on further peering into the water it was clear that it is deep water, just very clear. I can't remember what the ramp is like at Knife River.

It was a great trip with a wide variety of conditions, but then again I'm biased, the Apostles are one of my favorite places in the world.

Offline Rafici

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Re: Knife River to the Apostles
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2016, 08:32:45 PM »
That sounds like a good tri. I  will be printing off charts and aquired a guide book off the net.   I'm planning end of June taking 5-7 days and just cruising around.   I probably should look into something bit more suited than just an underarmor rain jacket

Offline Duckie

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Re: Knife River to the Apostles
« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2016, 09:35:42 AM »
I can see Lake Superior from my bedroom window.  The water in the lake is dangerously cold still at the end of June.  Because of that depending on the wind, it is likely to be darn cold sailing.  Personally, I like that.  The few days I spent in Port Aransas last October nearly killed me.  They don't call Duluth the air conditioned city for nothing, and that is why I stay here.  What I am saying is if you don't like the cold like I do, bring warm clothes: winter warm clothes.

The crossing from Knife River to the south shore is not very long, but it is seriously exposed especially from the east.  If you get a lively wind, you can expect to bounce around pretty badly.  However, if there are no fronts around the wind can be stable.  This crossing is one I expect to make in my 16.  I will want to make sure that the weather is forecast to be stable, but I don't think it is out of the question for my boat.  You will never be out of sight of land, but you will get a feeling of open water. 

The ramp at Knife River is pretty nice.  If you have to retrieve your 23 there, it will be fine.  I know there was a 23 for sale at the marina there last year so I can't imagine that you would have a tough time with the facilities. 

Al 

Offline JBC

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Re: Knife River to the Apostles
« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2016, 12:12:36 PM »
Al,

There must be something to the "cold weather/warm weather" people differentiation.  Having sailed a Potter 15 out of Port Aransas into the Gulf a bit, and seeing storms on Lake Superior froth those waters, I think I prefer warm weather sailing, even in my CP 16.  Though I love those Apostles and have seen a CP 16 sailing in the inner harbor of Duluth (perhaps yours?) some years ago, I have not really considered sailing Superior.  That cold biting wind off those waters is not always inviting.  Just last fall we were in the area and drove up the west shore of Superior to one of our favorite lodges (Naniboujou), and even walking the shoreline at various spots (and the jetty at Two Harbors) on a warm day, I sensed that those waters are always cold.  I do sail Lake Dillon in Colorado often now (cold water, but mostly mild weather in summer), but that's about as cold as I want when sailing these days.

Here's another view of weather on Superior, this time from the perspective of two wheels, that I enjoyed reading recently:
http://wakegreatlakes.org/wakeblog/one-pissed-lake-lake-superior-ride-part-2

Jett
 

Offline Duckie

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Re: Knife River to the Apostles
« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2016, 01:50:50 PM »
When my wife was a teenager she worked at Naniboujou as a waitress.  Cool place isn't it?  I have to admit that I loved Port Aransas.  What a cool little town.  I was there for the three day plywood boat show, so sailing was not my main objective.  I did live out of my Weekender though and boy did I miss air conditioning.  I would like to go back someday, but I have to find a way to get there and back while avoiding the ferocious Texas traffic. 

 I have only had my 16 for two summers, so I doubt that it was me you saw, though I do sail her in the harbor when I take her out.  Last summer I wasn't able to sail very much because of some medical stuff, but this year I intend to go all out.  If the wind is blowing a bit the harbor can get pretty bumpy, and it turns out that the 16 and I like to pound around in that.  I have noticed that even the bigger boats tend to hug the windward shore while I am throwing spray all over the place just a quarter mile away.

 In the summer, I guess anytime really, the east wind is the one you really have to watch out for.  There is a 200 mile fetch from that direction and it can be unreasonable at times.  There is another crossing I am contemplating in my 16.  The 22 mile crossing to Isle Royale  from Grand Portage is really an exposed crossing from pretty much all directions.  Even on a reasonable sailing day, the sea state can be something of  a ride.  That trip is totally dependent on stable weather.  However, there is a beautiful completely protected harbor to hide in once you get there. 

I have a lot of confidence in my 16.  I know that it is a small boat, but no one s putting a gun to my head to make me go sailing, so if I do have any doubts, I'll just sit that one out.  I also have an expensive drysuit and I'm not afraid to wear it. 

Al 

Offline JBC

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Re: Knife River to the Apostles
« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2016, 03:38:38 PM »
I too trust the Compac designs for big water and weather; just figure that your suggestion of having good warm/foul-weather gear for that lake, even in summer, is good advice!  We did watch a sailboat, probably a 27 or so footer, returning to Grand Portage from Isle Royale, while on a hike to the overlook point above the town, and as it was nice weather, even with a northeast wind, the run back looked fun.  I am envious of having such big water with all that scenery so close by...Colorado certainly has the latter, but a straight line sail of more than a few miles is hard to find in our mountains.

Jett