Author Topic: Anti-fouling  (Read 243 times)

Offline waterwheels

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Anti-fouling
« on: February 28, 2017, 04:42:34 PM »
Hey all,

Wondered if anyone is doing there own anti-fouling on the trailer or other wise and would have any helpful hint. So far I have taken to the local boat yard but it does get expensive. Still better than boat damage or worse, sustaining an injury due to the lack of proper equipment. Just wondered what others are doing?

Thanks Don


Offline Potcake boy

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Re: Anti-fouling
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2017, 05:43:56 PM »
Don,
My first boat, a 16, I did by sliding it off the trailer onto the front yard. That was my affordability range at the time. I have painted other boats on the trailer, but it's a real pain and as you noted, risky. So if age and experience equals wisdom, then my advice would be to take it to the yard and have them block it for you. It's so much easier and safer and you get a better-finished job with much less effort. There are so many things that we are required to pay for to protect others from our own actions, you probably owe it to yourself and your family to pay a modest price for your own personal protection. You are saving a fair amount by applying the paint yourself.
Ron
Pilot House 23 - GladRags
Punta Gorda Florida

A mouse around the house - but much hotter on the water

Offline brackish

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Re: Anti-fouling
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2017, 09:08:20 AM »
I've done my 23 on the trailer.  I paint everything I can get to first, then put two jacks under the keel (in areas already painted), jack it up just enough to clear the keel rollers and the bunks.  My drive has a slight slope laterally so it tends to lift from one bunk stay on the other, so I have to jack it up twice and guy it to the high side bunk.  I put wedges at the ends of the bunk it is lifted from, I can paint that area first since there is about 6 inches at the front and back of the bunks that don't contact the hull.  I don't consider it risky, it is very well supported, but it is quite difficult, i.e. physically demanding.  Since the yard here does not allow you to use your own labor or paint on their property, it is the difference between a $1600 job and a $200 job to do it myself. 

It takes me a day to pressure wash and light sand and a couple of days to put two coats on everything, most of it intercoat dry time, and I do a lot of other maintenance while it is out of the water which my yard would not let me do while in their shop. So since I have to haul it anyway to do the other stuff............
« Last Edit: March 01, 2017, 09:11:55 AM by brackish »

Offline waterwheels

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Re: Anti-fouling
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2017, 12:19:04 PM »
Thanks for all the sound advise. I too used to push my CL- 16 off in the grass to work on the centre board and bottom but will not be doing that with the Eclipse for sure.
Will most likely take to boat yard this year but keep an eye out for some good supports. The bottom of the keel that rests on the trailer looks like it would support the weight and keep the boat fairly solid. So was thinking if it was supported well with some supports, I could temporarily remove the bunks to do the job, then put them back. Could do in in the carport out of any wind and weather.
But also agree....better safe than sorry.


Offline relamb

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Re: Anti-fouling
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2017, 05:05:56 PM »
I've done my  CP23, and CP27  on their trailers.  I slid my 16 off the trailer and laid it on it's side on some tires in the yard, did one side then the other.
Here's a post with photos on doing the CP27
http://cpyoa.geekworkshosting.com/forum/index.php?topic=8010.msg58847#msg58847
Rick
Rick
CP16 CP23 CP27
Zionsville, IN

Offline Potcake boy

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Re: Anti-fouling
« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2017, 05:53:03 PM »
Don,

For sure the keel will support the boat and is the only thing that should take the weight. Trailer bunks and jack stands are only for the purpose of preventing the boat from falling to the side. If you have a means of lifting the boat enough to get the trailer out then you could set her on blocks on the keel just like they do at the marina. You would then just need to place stands to keep her from falling over. So if you compare the cost of a suitable lift and jack stands to the annual cost of the marina then you have a better picture of the practicality of doing it yourself.  You also have the issue of a workspace, storing the equipment and your labor to consider.

Have you noticed that as the size of the boat increases, so does the budget and work involved? I see my boat as a pie with 3 pieces, enjoyment, work, expense. If you have a million dollars in the bank then the enjoyment piece will be the biggest, but otherwise, there has to be a compromise. So as the boat gets bigger and you don't have the budget to keep the work part contained then your enjoyment slice is gonna shrink. Just be careful that the work doesn't become the goal. Go out and sail.
Ron
Pilot House 23 - GladRags
Punta Gorda Florida

A mouse around the house - but much hotter on the water